IEEE Nanotechnology Council
Advancing Nanotech for Humanity
IEEE
January 11th, 2019

Check out our FAQ page to find out more about

the IEEE Nanotechnology Council!

 

 

February 12th, 2016

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IEEE NTC Facebook websites are linked below. It can also be linked to by the facebook option at the upper right corner of the front page of the NTC website.

NTC officers, members, conference/workshop organizers are invited to join it and post relevant information.

4.1 Open website in which only authorized members are allowed to post articles:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/550239578466583/

4.2 Open website in which only the web host is allowed to post articles: https://www.facebook.com/IEEENanotechnologyCouncil/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

November 14th, 2020

Hearty congratulations to the following 2021 NTC Award Winners! Stay tuned for further details about the Awards Ceremony.

Pioneer Award
The Pioneer Award recognizes individuals who have had a significant impact on the field of nanotechnology by virtue of initiating new areas of research, development or engineering.

  • Professor Jean-Pierre Leburton
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    “For pioneering contribution to the theory and simulation of semiconductor nanostructures and low dimensional nanoscale devices.”

Early Career Awards
The Early Career Award recognizes individuals who have made contributions with a major impact on the field of nanotechnology.

  • Professor Max Shulaker
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    “For his pioneering work in carbon nanotubes and the broad area of nano-systems, including nanofabrication technologies, nanodevices, circuits, and architectures.”
  • Dr. Myeong-Lok Seol
    NASA Ames Research Center
    “For innovative contributions to the development of triboelectric power generation and printed supercapacitors for space missions.”

Distinguished Service Award
The Distinguished Service Award recognizes an individual who has performed outstanding service for the benefit and advancement of the Nanotechnology Council.

  • Professor John Yeow
    University of Waterloo
    “For distinguished service, including accomplishments as an Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine and other service achievements.”

To view the full detailed listing of each award please visit the Awards page on our website. Nominations are due on 1 October of each year. Nominators should utilize the forms associated with each award description found here. For further information, please contact the Awards Committee Chair.

 

November 11th, 2020

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council is pleased to announce the appointments of Distinguished Lecturers for 2021.

The list is below; details can be found on the Distinguished Lecturers 2021 page.

DL Name Topic(s)
Oluwaseyi Balogun* Nanometrology, Nanothermometry, and Imaging of Low Dimensional Materials using Plasmonic Nanofocusing Approaches
Reuven Gordon* Nanoplasmonics: Reaching out to the Single Molecule
Chengkuo Lee* Toward 5G based AI + IoT (AIoT) Society Enabled by NanoEnergy-NanoSystem (NENS) Technology
Zhang Li* Magnetic Nanoparticle Swarm for Active Delivery
P M (Markondeya Pulugurtha) Raj* Heterogeneous System Component Integration with Nanopackaging
Gwo-Bin Lee Micro/Nanofluidicsfor biological applications
Jin-Woo Han 1: Nanomaterials in Printed and Flexible Electronics
2: Nanoscale Vacuum Electronics: Back to the Future
Elena A. Rozhkova 1: Merging Nanotechnology & Synthetic Biology toward Directed Evolution of Energy Materials
2: Magnetic Nanostructures for Future Medicine: from Cell Actuation to Ultrasensitive Detection
3: Nano for BRAIN technologies
Han Wang* Novel Electronic and Photonic Devices based on Low-Dimensional Materials
Qing Zhang* Roles of Semiconductor Junctions in Mechanical-Electrical Power Conversion
* Re-appointment for second year.
November 11th, 2020

The NTC Technical Activities are currently developed in 15 TCs, covering almost all scientific areas of interest to the NTC. The role of each NTC TC is to serve as a focal point for research in a specific area. The actions undertaken by each NTC TC are developed by its Members under the leadership of the Chair/Co-Chairs. Each NTC TC is established for a 4-year term and can be renewed by the NTC AdCom after a progress report and evaluation. Recently new Chairs of two of the NTC TCs have been reformed.

For a full list of NTC’s 2020 Technical Committee, click here.

It is our pleasure to announce the new Chair of the NTC TC5 Spintronics, Pramey Upadhyaya. On behalf of the NTC TAC, I would like to thank him for taking this responsibility and wish him a very successful leadership.

Pramey Upadhyaya is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Purdue University. Before joining Purdue, Pramey was a postdoctoral scholar in the Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California Los Angeles, working under the mentorship of Prof. Yaroslav Tserkovnyak. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India, in 2009, and the master’s and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering department from the University of California Los Angeles, USA, in 2011 and 2015, respectively. During his Ph.D., he was a resident theorist in the experimental group (Device Research Laboratory) led by Prof. Kang Wang. His research has explored the theory of classical and quantum spintronic phenomenon and their device applications, enabled by electrical and thermal control of magnetism. Along with his teammates, this work has resulted in one of the earliest demonstrations of current-induced room-temperature skyrmion manipulations, spin torque switching by topological surface states and NV-center probing of spin-caloritronics. These works have resulted in over 30 publications in journals including Science, Physical Review Letters, Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Materials and Nature Communications. He is a recipient of NSF CAREER (2020), Qualcomm Innovation fellowship (2013) and Intel summer fellowship (2011).

Kremena Makasheva
VP for Technical Activities

 

November 11th, 2020

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council is pleased to announce a Special Region 9 Webinar. Details below:

Special Region 9 Webinar Announcement:
Central & South America & the Caribbean
19th November, 2020 at 2:00-4:00pm GMT
Mexico (GMT-6): 8:00-10:00am
Bogota, Quito, Lima (GMT-5): 9:00-11:00am
La Paz (GMT-4): 10:00am-12:00pm
Buenos Aires, Santiago (GMT-3): 11:00am-1:00pm

Webinar is FREE, but registration is required. Register before 19 November at:  https://ieeemeetings.webex.com/ieeemeetings/onstage/g.php?MTID=e133e66ebebee6b2848456527f1246d3b

Program
14:00 GMT – Welcome to the Webinar & Introduction to the IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) (Camilo Tellez Villamizar, Region 9 NTC Chapters Coordinator)
14:15 – GMT Introduction to the Speaker (Lorena Garcia, R9 Technical Actvities Chair)
14:20 – GMT Webinar Presentation (Juliana Jaramillo-Fernandez)
15:20 – GMT Q&A via WebEx Chat (Juliana Jaramillo-Fernandez)
15:30 – GMT Chapter Development (Camilo Tellez Villamizar & James Morris, NTC President)

 

Introduction to Nanotechnology
Juliana Jaramillo-Fernandez
Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2),
CSIC and BIST, Campus UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain

Al inicio del siglo XX, la física moderna empezó a revelar tímidamente las muy diferentes propiedades que la materia exhibía cuando sus dimensiones características disminuían a la escala de los átomos. Esta fue la semilla que décadas después permitió el nacimiento de la nanotecnología.  Esta rama del conocimiento está determinada por una colaboración intima entre ciencia, ingeniería y tecnología en constante evolución.

Los más recientes avances en nanotecnología han permitido la fabricación de materiales y dispositivos con longitudes características que pueden acercarse a unos pocos nanómetros. Estos nuevos materiales nanoestructurados son cada vez más importantes en nuestras vidas, debido a las propiedades inusuales que exhiben en el reino de lo nano. Algunos ejemplos incluyen las nanopartículas, los nanopilares, los puntos cuánticos, las películas delgadas, los nanotubos los nanocompuestos, entre otros. Estos materiales abarcan un gran número de aplicaciones en diversos campos, incluyendo la energía fotovoltaica, que tiene como objetivo convertir la luz solar en electricidad, o la termoeléctrica que transforma la energía térmica de un gradiente de temperatura en energía eléctrica. Estas nuevas tecnologías se presentan como una solución muy atractiva a los crecientes problemas ambientales y limitaciones de recursos energéticos. En esta webinar, recorreremos los principales aspectos de la nanotecnología, exploraremos los avances más recientes y discutiremos las aplicaciones tecnológicas, científicas y comerciales emergentes.

Dr. Juliana Jaramillo Fernandez is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie COFUND PSPHERE- postdoctoral fellow at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Barcelona, Spain. Previously, she was a postdoctoral researcher at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm. She obtained her PhD from CENTRALESUPÉLEC (France) in 2015 with a thesis on Thermal Nanosciences and M.Sc in Materials Science at Université de Limoges (France) in 2011. The same year, Juliana got her Bachelor degree in Engineering Physics at EAFIT University in Colombia. Currently, she is using her expertise on micro and nanoscale heat transfer to develop sustainable thermal management solutions that can significantly reduce the current high energy footprint of modern thermoregulation technologies. She is developing new passive systems that only make use of non-toxic materials, while developing further understanding on thermal energy transport via surface phonon polaritons. Her research focuses on phonon engineering, heat transfer in semiconductor nanostructures, tailoring physical properties of low-dimensional materials and controlling thermal transport within nanostructures. Earlier this year, she was conferred the Best Postdoc Paper Award 2018-2019, on the occasion of the International Day of Women and Girls in Sciences at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for her work on thermofunctional materials for radiative cooling. Moreover, she was honored with The Collider Tech award in 2019 by the Mobile World Capital BCN, a prize for research projects selected to create disruptive tech start-ups.

See future announcements for English/Portuguese translations for Brazil/Trinidad & Tobago.
 

 

November 11th, 2020

At its 6 November meeting, the Nanotechnology Council ratified the following Presidential appointments:

Standards Committee Chair:
Tyler L. Jaynes, Albany Medical College

Industrial Advisory Committee Chair:
Valentyn Novosad, Argonne National Laboratory

Regional Activities & Chapters Committee Chair:
Lan Fu, Australian National University

Regional Chapter Coordinators:
(joining R8: Attila Bonyar)
R1-R7: Vasuda Bhatia, San Jose State University
R9: Camilo Tellez Villamizar, Universidad Catolica de Colombia
R10 (India): Brajesh Kumar Kaushik, IIT-Roorkee
R10 (other): Zhiming Wang, UESTC, Chengdu

November 11th, 2020

 

The 14th IEEE Int’l Conference on Nano/Molecular Medicine & Engineering (IEEE-NANOMED 2020) will be held on 14-16 December 2020 in an all-virtual format!

IEEE-NANOMED is one of the premier annual events organized by the IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC), dedicated to provide a forum to discuss the latest developments in all areas of the Nano/Molecular Medicine & Engineering.

Abstract Deadline: November 30, 2020

Early-bird Registration Deadline: December 10, 2020

Website: https://ieee-nanomed.org/2020/
 
 
 
 

October 22nd, 2020

NMDC 2020 – Free for all!

http://nmdc2020.org/

 

We are pleased to invite you to attend 2020 IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC), which is to be held online during Oct. 26-27, 2020.

This online conference will run with virtual session rooms and facilities for online presentation and discussion, through which the attendees will have similar experience to the one-site conference.

View the Program at a Glance.

For more information and to register, click here.

Important Dates
Conference Dates: October 26-27, 2020
Registration Deadline: October 23, 2020

Click the link below or scan the QR code for Registration:

http://iconference.mikecrm.com/RdrO2wb

 

 

 

October 21st, 2020

The Nanotechnology Council is pleased to announce the winner of the special election for VP Publications was Supriyo Bandyopadhyay.

Supriyo Bandyopadhyay is Commonwealth Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University where he directs the Quantum Device Laboratory. His research has been featured in multiple magazines (Business Week, EE Times), journals (Nanotechnology, Nature), internet blogs, TV (CBS), radio (NPR) and many other forums. Prof. Bandyopadhyay is the author/co-author of over 400 research publications and three text books. He was named “Virginia’s Outstanding Scientist” by Governor Terrence McAuliffe in 2016 and won the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award in 2018. He was given the “University Award of Excellence” in 2017; it is the highest award given by his university to one faculty member in a given year. Dr. Bandyopadhyay received numerous other awards and is this year’s winner of the IEEE Nanotechnology Pioneer Award. He is a Fellow of IEEE, American Physical Society, Institute of Physics, the Electrochemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

His emphasis will be to dramatically increase the impact factors of all NTC journals,

  • By inviting topical reviews from leaders in the field. Associate editors will submit proposals for topical reviews and identify/persuade the most eminent contributors to contribute topical reviews.
  • Editors in Chief of ALL NTC journals will attend all NTC conferences and showcase their journals by giving a talk about them and be present for questions and answers.
  • Adopt a non-traditional approach of publishing “roadmap” or “perspective” type articles (invited and contributed) which tend to attract more citations since they appeal to a broader audience.
  • Associate editors will be asked to “filter” submissions.
  • Reduce the time between submission to final decision by expanding the reviewer pool.
  • Promote the journal in under-represented areas – eastern Europe and Eurasia, Africa, Latin America and Asia. Appoint associate editors from these areas.
  • Promote gender equity and geographical diversity among associate editors.

Please congratulate Prof. Bandyopadhyay on his election as VP Publications.

October 15th, 2020

Article by P M Raj, Florida International University, Miami, Nanotechnology Technical Committee Chair

The primary mission of Nanopackaging TC is to promote nanotechnologies to packaging community and accelerate their adoption by disseminating the knowledge through conferences, webinars, industry-academia interactions, IEEE web portals, newsletters and other means. The final goal is to create synergistic research ecosystems to solve the technical barriers and enable future electronics. The recent conferences, IEEE NANO and ECTC brought several key advances in nanopackagingt to limelight. This newsletter highlights those advances and also provides details about upcoming IEEE NMDC 2021 and upcoming IEEE International Electronics Week in Europe. Read more here.

October 9th, 2020

Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible and more, someday, thanks to an ambitious new project underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

NIST researchers are in the early stages of a massive undertaking to design and build a fleet of tiny ultra-sensitive thermometers. If they succeed, their system will be the first to make real-time measurements of temperature on the microscopic scale in an opaque 3D volume — which could include medical implants, refrigerators, and even the human body.

The project is called Thermal Magnetic Imaging and Control (Thermal MagIC), and the researchers say it could revolutionize temperature measurements in many fields: biology, medicine, chemical synthesis, refrigeration, the automotive industry, plastic production — “pretty much anywhere temperature plays a critical role,” said NIST physicist Cindi Dennis. “And that’s everywhere.”

Measuring and controlling temperature in 3D is highly desirable for medical diagnostics, precision manufacturing, and much more. However, there is currently no way to measure 3D temperature inside these kinds of systems. NIST researchers are working on a solution using tiny nanoscale thermometers. Credit: Sean Kelley/NIST. Music: Blue Dot Sessions.The NIST team has now finished building its customized laboratory spaces for this unique project and has begun the first major phase of the experiment.

Thermal MagIC will work by using nanometer-sized objects whose magnetic signals change with temperature. The objects would be incorporated into the liquids or solids being studied — the melted plastic that might be used as part of an artificial joint replacement, or the liquid coolant being recirculated through a refrigerator. A remote sensing system would then pick up these magnetic signals, meaning the system being studied would be free from wires or other bulky external objects.

The final product could make temperature measurements that are 10 times more precise than state-of-the-art techniques, acquired in one-tenth the time in a volume 10,000 times smaller. This equates to measurements accurate to within 25 millikelvin (thousandths of a kelvin) in as little as a tenth of a second, in a volume just a hundred micrometers (millionths of a meter) on a side. The measurements would be “traceable” to the International System of Units (SI); in other words, its readings could be accurately related to the fundamental definition of the kelvin, the world’s basic unit of temperature.

The system aims to measure temperatures over the range from 200 to 400 kelvin (K), which is about -99 to 260 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This would cover most potential applications — at least the ones the Thermal MagIC team envisions will be possible within the next 5 years. Dennis and her colleagues see potential for a much larger temperature range, stretching from 4 K-600 K, which would encompass everything from supercooled superconductors to molten lead. But that is not a part of current development plans.

“This is a big enough sea change that we expect that if we can develop it — and we have confidence that we can — other people will take it and really run with it and do things that we currently can’t imagine,” Dennis said.

Potential applications are mostly in research and development, but Dennis said the increase in knowledge would likely trickle down to a variety of products, possibly including 3D printers, refrigerators, and medicines.

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